Brain Injuries

By the time the clock strikes midnight tonight, 44 new brain injuries will be sustained by individuals in Ontario. Each year, 50,000 Canadians suffer an Acquired Brain Injury (ABI). An injury to the brain is likely to result in death or permanent disability. Brain injury is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide.

An acquired brain injury (ABI) is damage to the brain which occurs after birth due to a traumatic event, such as a blow to the head, or a non-traumatic event, such as a medical event (stroke, etc.). It is not due to a congenital disorder or a progressively degenerative disorder. As the brain is a complex and delicate organ, damage to the brain can produce long term difficulties.

What is ABI?

Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) is damage to the brain that occurs after birth from a traumatic or non-traumatic event. ABI is not related to a congenital disorder or a degenerative disease, such as Alzheimer’s Disease, Multiple Sclerosis or Parkinson’s Disease. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is damage to the brain caused by a traumatic event such as, a blow to the head, a fall, a motor vehicle collision or a sports related injury. Non-Traumatic Brain Injury is damage to the brain caused by illness such as meningitis or encephalitis, oxygen deprivation (anoxia) or stroke.

Acquired brain injury (ABI) is 15 times more common than spinal cord injury, 30 times more common than breast cancer and 400 times more common than HIV/AIDS. Statistics show that the need to support people living with the effects of ABI is great.

Facts

  • Brain injuries are the leading cause of death and disability for Canadians under the age of 35; with the highest rate of injury occuring between the ages of 15 – 24 years.
  • More than 800 Ontarians die each year due to brain injuries.
  • More than 12,000 people in Ontario sustain brain injuries each year.
  • Males are more likely than females to incur a traumatic brain injury.

See OBIA Impact Report 2012 www.obia.ca/the-obia-impact-report/